About Us

“In all the shores, hills, and valleys...”

Who We Are

The Mu Sigma Phi Fraternity is the first fraternity in the UP College of Medicine. It is also the first medical fraternity in the Asian region. Its birth in October 1933 was the answer to the need for a college organization that would uphold true brotherhood, responsible leadership, advancement of scholastic and cultural welfare, and an unselfish spirit of service.

Now in its 88th year and with 1,696 members, the fraternity has moulded the Brothers of the Mu Sigma Phi to become pioneers, heroes, leaders, scholars, luminaries, scientists, and humanitarians in the field of medicine. The fraternity stands today as among the most acclaimed student organizations in the Philippines, and the leading Greek-lettered global network of UP Medical Alumni.

50
Years of Glory
10
Brothers, Healers, and Leaders
0
Time Most Outstanding Student Organization Awardee
0
Time Hall of Fame Inductee
50
Years of Glory
10
Brothers, Healers, and Leaders
0
Time Most Outstanding Student Organization Awardee
0
Time Hall of Fame Inductee

We Are Mu Sigma Phi.

Mission

To breed, to nurture and to cradle fine and selected young men in their noble transformation of becoming dedicated physicians within the culture of excellence, nationalism and humanity and in full accordance with its ideals of brotherhood, scholarship, service and leadership.

Vision

The Mu Sigma Phi envisions itself as a locally and internationally acclaimed brotherhood dedicated to the relentless pursuit of excellence in the field of medical education and practice, and selfless commitment to public service.

The History of the Fraternity

On a balmy Tuesday afternoon on October 3,1933, the emptiness of the College amphitheater came to life when four members of Class 1935 entered the room.  They eagerly waited for the arrival of their classmates and other male members of Classes 1936 and 1937, whom they invited for the purpose of presenting a plan to establish a new student organization– a fraternity among the medical students.

For the past months, Saturnino B. Ador-Dionisio a respected student leader together with three other classmates namely Manuel G. Baliwag, Manuel M. Ramos, and Antonio T. Unchuan have been drafting the paperwork needed to create a new student organization that would promote brotherhood, scholarship and leadership in the U.P. College of Medicine. They invited the cream-of-the-crop from each class and believed in their hearts that those who will show up will accept and join their proposal.

The tranquility of the amphitheater slowly reverberated with life as the invited members of Classes 1935, 1936, and 1937 trickled in while they enthusiastically speculated the agenda of the meeting. The atmosphere was filled with fervor but silence filled the room once again as soon as Baliwag started to introduce Ador-Dionisio who subsequently presented the proposal carefully penned by Ramos and Unchuan.  

The presentation was well prepared and straightforward. It was presented in an engaging and appealing pace. Everyone listened intently. Questions were asked and answered. The medical students glanced among each other with evident and inconspicuous nods of approval.  One asked how this organization will be called.  Ramos stepped forward beside Ador-Dionisio and proudly announced as if on cue– “Medical Students’ Fraternity.”  Baliwag picked a piece of chalk and turned to the blackboard and with bold strokes scribbled the following Greek letters– MSF.

History was carved from a blank stone on that fateful afternoon in October 1933.

Saturnino Ador-Dionisio placed a piece of paper on a table and requested the assembly of students to sign if they wished to be part of the group who will constitute the proposed organization.  Thirty students belonging to Classes 1935, 1936 and 1937 committed to join. A lot of requirements had to be accomplished and submitted to the Committee on Student Organizations and Activities of the University.  New organizations were required to draft a preamble, aims and principles, and by-laws.  A coat-of-arms had to be designed.  A set of officers had to be elected.  With fervent zeal, the students drafted what needed to be accomplished.  The last thing they needed was an endorsement from the College Dean.